God and Sex: What the Bible Really Says

God and Sex What the Bible Really Says For several decades Michael Coogan s introductory course on the Old Testament has been a perennial favorite among students at Harvard University In God and Sex Coogan examines one of the most contro

  • Title: God and Sex: What the Bible Really Says
  • Author: Michael D. Coogan
  • ISBN: 9780446545259
  • Page: 360
  • Format: Imitation Leather
  • For several decades, Michael Coogan s introductory course on the Old Testament has been a perennial favorite among students at Harvard University In God and Sex, Coogan examines one of the most controversial aspects of the Hebrew Scripture What the Old Testament really says about sex, and how contemporary understanding of those writings is frequently misunderstood or misFor several decades, Michael Coogan s introductory course on the Old Testament has been a perennial favorite among students at Harvard University In God and Sex, Coogan examines one of the most controversial aspects of the Hebrew Scripture What the Old Testament really says about sex, and how contemporary understanding of those writings is frequently misunderstood or misrepresented In the engaging and witty voice generations of students have appreciated, Coogan explores the language and social world of the Bible, showing how much innuendo and euphemism is at play, and illuminating the sexuality of biblical figures as well as God By doing so, Coogan reveals the immense gap between popular use of Scripture and its original context God and Sex is certain to provoke, entertain, and enlighten readers.

    • ↠ God and Sex: What the Bible Really Says || ↠ PDF Download by Ó Michael D. Coogan
      360 Michael D. Coogan
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ God and Sex: What the Bible Really Says || ↠ PDF Download by Ó Michael D. Coogan
      Posted by:Michael D. Coogan
      Published :2019-07-14T02:25:49+00:00

    One thought on “God and Sex: What the Bible Really Says”

    1. If you're hoping for a biblical Harlequin, look elsewhere. This is a heavy little book, even a little overwhelming, as it delves into the sexual inequalities of biblical times. I found the book rather dark in places; an obvious agenda of the author is to extol how grateful we should be to have outgrown the biblical view of women as property. Indeed there are multiple horror stories of how women were treated in the Bible, but is it healthy to overdose on this topic? Coogan touches only briefly on [...]

    2. This book is meant to be understood. Its title is not only provocative, but also stamped prominently in gold. The book is printed like a cheap bible (imitation leather and gold stamping with "religious" art on the flypapers) and so even though I was in search of another book on the topic, this one jumped out at me. The language in simple to understand. Its lacks jargon and is heavy on example.However, it is still a scholarly, intelligent book. The author is concerned neither with dogma nor polit [...]

    3. Whilst searching my libraries to see if any had a copy of Stephen Prothero's God Is Not One: The Eight Rival Religions That Run the World--and Why Their Differences Matter (2 did, huzzah!), I came across this interesting, potential gem.___________________________God and Sex is a short discussion (195 pages text) of the many places in the Bible where “sex” and related subjects come up. There’s no real discussion of any particular passage but Coogan’s point in this brief book is that the B [...]

    4. I love the premise of this book, and it had a lot of potential. Coogan is (apparently) a top biblical scholar, and wrote this book for the American masses to explain just what exactly the Bible does have to say about marriage, adultery, homos, pregnancy and abortion, prostitution, the status of women, and any sex- or gender-related topic that people talk or vote about these days. His purpose is to contextualize the passages that people cite simplistically for political reasons. I love some good [...]

    5. I choose this book hoping that it would present an objective view of the bible as a piece of literature; however I was left disappointed in many aspects. The author is a Harvard lecturer on the Old Testament and as a result most of his focus is on the Old Testament, which is fine. However, when he does mention the New Testament he offers a very incomplete and flawed picture of the text. He makes statements that I can easily refute using common texts and commonly accepted treatment of the text by [...]

    6. I picked this up on the spur of the moment in the library today, and I'm fairly pleased. It's not a perfect work -- I personally would have liked to see a LOT more hard linguistic discussion in such a textual topic -- but I appreciated its historo-critical approach. That's probably the biggest hurdle for a potential reader. But then, if the reader isn't OK with a historical approach, he or she probably isn't going to be on board with a book that subtitles itself "What the Bible Really Says."

    7. I was somewhat disappointed with this work. Despite the glowing reviews I found a book that lacked cohesion and was devoid of any conclusion.Although I agree with the author on two of his main premises, that the Bible can only really be viewed in the primitive context in which it was written and that all theological language is nothing more than metaphor, I felt that he did nothing with the texts to provide a modern-day interaction.A so-so effort.

    8. I read this at about the same time as I read Unprotected Texts: The bible's Surprising Contradictions about Sex and Desire by Jennifer Wright Knust. And then I got busy and waited a bit to write this review, so I'm afraid the two books are now hopelessly and inextricably smooshed together (yes, that's a technical term) in my brain. So please keep that in mind as you read the reviewDr. Coogan starts out laying the foundation of his premise regarding the Bible: "These books [the books included in [...]

    9. This was a really interesting and informative book! Despite being one of the most popular books in human history, most people have not actually read the Bible from to cover, and as a result, there is a great deal of misinformation in the general public around what the Bible does and does not say, particularly on issues related to sex, gender, and sexuality. What Coogan does best in this book is making clear to the reader that the Bible is often inconsistent and contradictory on matters of sex, g [...]

    10. Michael Coogan lays out some info that I did not know before. I will never look at "laughing" or "mocking" the same way (see Genesis 21). I will contend that Coogan, while making some excellent points, does miss out on analyzing Genesis 39:9. In this text, Joseph looks at sleeping with Potiphar's wife as "sinning against God" - something that I do not think he took seriously in his book.Joseph, at least, sees adultery (or in his case fornication/adultery - fornication for him, since he wasn't ma [...]

    11. A decent overview of what the Bible has to say about women's rights, abortion, marriage, homosexual behavior, and sex both in and outside of marriage.One of the more interesting points was how women were viewed as property in biblical times. Marriages were more like transactions of property between husband and father than consensual acts of romantic union between husband and wife. Another noteworthy part was the passages describing Yahweh as a jealous god, and how he treated Israel as the victim [...]

    12. This is a good overview of sexual language, gender roles, and scriptural passages regarding adultery, prostitution, abortion, and homosexuality in the Bible. The text focuses more on the Old Testament than New Testament, but as the Old Testament includes much more in terms of heredity and social laws of the time, this isn't surprising.The title "God and Sex" may be slightly misleading. Although we are talking about the Bible, and while God is certainly mentioned, it is really more an examination [...]

    13. I'm giving it five stars for its prescience and clarity about the modern relevance of Biblical text--not for its ease of reading. It is a theological book, so that it speaks about the dozens of characters as though the reader is already passably familiar with them makes sense. But it is hard to keep track of all these people with their brief stories. Coogan locates why homosexuality was criminal in the Bible in the contemporary cultural concern over mixing categories generally. It is listed as a [...]

    14. Anytime I can read a book that may further help me understand the Bible and what God's word really means I am excited to read it, so I jumped at the chance to review God And Sex What The Bible Really Says by Michael Coogan. With that being said, even though it had me looking up a few scriptures, overall, the ideas presented in this book was quite different from my religious upbringing. This book sheds a different light on the topic of sex in the Bible. He explains very simply how meanings can be [...]

    15. This was slightly more academic than I expected, but still interesting. I expected Coogan to take more of a stand throughout the book on how to interpret what the Bible says for today's world, but it wasn't until the conclusion chapter that he puts forth his personal theory. Through the rest of the book, he simply gathers the Bible verses that relate to each individual topic (women's rights, marriage, forbidden sexual relationships, rape, etc.) and presents them in all their contradictory glory. [...]

    16. I was initially interested in this study of how the Bible really portrays sex (and related issues- female equality, abortion, gender roles, sexual orientation, adultery, incest, etc.) because I was told that Coogan presents an unbiased argument based purely on what the Bible literally says. For the most part, I agree with that statement, though I am a bit confused about what exactly Coogan was trying to achieve by essentially arguing that the Bible is outmoded and doesn't say much that is releva [...]

    17. This book was so informative. It speaks to a topic in Christianity that is not widely discussed. Most assume that that today's nuclear family, with the coupling of a single woman and man are justified Biblical. This book show the diversity and expounds upon truths regarding sexual relations, divorce, marriage, and even evidence that asserts that God himself has a consort.I believe that Coogan is very through,at least as much as he can be for a book that is meant to be read by the general public. [...]

    18. This was another one I got from the library the other day. The new non-fiction shelf had so much interesting-looking stuff! I could have gone home with a whole bag full of books just from that section, but new books are only two-week loans, so I limited it to just three. Anyway, this one stood out because of the title, and also because it has a faux-leather Bible-esque cover, so it caught my eye right away.[return][return]I have been interested in reading books about the Bible and about Christia [...]

    19. The stories weren’t as titillating as I was expecting, but Coogan does define a few biblical terms that in current terminology don’t make any sense as being offensive, such as letting the reader know that references to hands and feet that shouldn’t be shown are euphemisms for penises. He also points out, quite often, that in biblical times women were property and violating (that is having sex with) a women wasn’t a crime because it hurt the woman, but because it damaged a man’s propert [...]

    20. This was a clear, concise discussion of statements in the Bible that pertain to the status of women, marriage, banned sexual practices, and God's wives (yes, the Bible says that God had a wife or two and fathered children). The point that author Coogan is trying to make is that the Bible was written by human beings living in a certain place at a certain time, in the midst of a certain culture. Everything in the Bible must be understood in the context of the language and cultural expectations of [...]

    21. Coogan provides and easy-to-read, well cited, book discussing what the Bible has to say about sex. It covers the topics of who can and/or should be having sex, who shouldn't, homosexuallity, abortion, the Biblical euphemisms for sex, and more. Because of its numerous verses cited this book provides an excellent reference which I am glad to have on my shelf. Coogan discusses each topic by citing or quoting the relevant verses and gives any needed contextual information. Coogan points out the many [...]

    22. Short, sweet, and to the point, Coogan's God and Sex clips right along as it examines what the Bible really says about messy topics like marriage, divorce, adultery, abortion, homosexuality, rape, prostitution and a bevy of other things guaranteed to start arguments over the dinner table. Coogan keeps his personal agenda largely confined to the introduction and conclusion, leaving the majority of his book to the exploration of the text and its historical context. Wonderful for anyone, but partic [...]

    23. I enjoyed it.Neither salacious nor proselytizing, this book is an informative, if not academic look at what the Bible has to say about issues of sex & gender roles and the answers are somewhat surprising.While it's bound to ruffle the feathers of those who hold the the Bible as the immutable & literal word of God, rather than as an anthology of literary artifacts, Coogan's book is well researched & thoughtfully constructed."God & Sex" challenges preconceived notions by often givi [...]

    24. This was required reading for a course I'll be taking in June at Yale. I've read other works by Michael Coogan (he's the general editor of the Oxford Annotated Bible, for goodness' sake!) and knew this would be a well researched and written description of the varied (and scandalous) attitudes and depictions of sex in the Bible. Overtly critical of those who naively espouse the "family values" that they wrongly think are in the Bible, Coogan concludes, "the Bible must be interpreted--interpreted [...]

    25. He had me until the last chapter, where it got a little weird (God has genitals? And a wife? what? relevance?) I think the topic is fascinating- there's so many social "norms" that come from a sentence in the Bible- it's just so interesting that we base our very societal foundations on a passing mention. There was a very enlightening section about euphemisms in the Bible (man, Jesus getting his feet washed was apparently DIRTY) and extensive examination about the double standards of men and wome [...]

    26. This could be an easy quick read; or you could read it in depth by including the many biblical and other references left by the author at the reader's fingertips. As the author states in the introduction, "we will find sex in places where people do not usually see it." Indeed. You may never read the Sunday School stories in the same way. After giving much detailed information, I appreciated the last chapter, "Conclusions", where the author states, " Taken as a wholee Bible can be understood as t [...]

    27. God and Sex basically explains the true meaning behind Sex from the Bible. It explains the way to "know" someone in a sexual level not only a personal level. The topics are anywhere in from Virginity and Adultery to Abortion and Divorce. I gave this book my 100 page test and decided it was not for me. It is an interesting book and can give you highlights on different topics if that's what you like. Overall, very interestingview link: onceuponatwilight/2011

    28. Not quite what I was expecting but helpful nonetheless. Five or ten years ago I probably would have labeled it as heresy; now I found it very useful in giving voice to ideas and conclusions I have slowly been arriving at regarding how to approach the Bible. Although much of the book felt rambling and unfocused the brief conclusion section succinctly summarizes a healthy approach to reading and interpreting Scripture.

    29. I would not recommend this books to folks who are easily offended. Coogan says some pretty controversial things, however, he uses biblical texts and historical context to support his conclusions. In the final chapter Coogan offers an alternative way to interpret the bible that I think honors the Bible as a foundational text while also acknowledging that we live in a very different time than when the book was written.

    30. God and Sex basically explains the true meaning behind Sex from the Bible. It explains the way to "know" someone in a sexual level not only a personal level. The topics are anywhere in from Virginity and Adultery to Abortion and Divorce. I gave this book my 100 page test and decided it was not for me. It is an interesting book and can give you highlights on different topics if that's what you like. Overall, very interesting.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *