Swahili for the Broken-Hearted

Swahili for the Broken Hearted Question What do you do when you re dumped by the Girl Next Door Answer Throw yourself into another madcap adventure and travel from Cape Town to CairoA week after breaking up with the GND his travell

  • Title: Swahili for the Broken-Hearted
  • Author: Peter Moore
  • ISBN: 9780553814521
  • Page: 416
  • Format: Paperback
  • Question What do you do when you re dumped by the Girl Next Door Answer Throw yourself into another madcap adventure and travel from Cape Town to CairoA week after breaking up with the GND his travelling companion through Central America Peter Moore heads off to Africa to lose himself for a while In the grand tradition of 19th century scoundrelas, explorers and romQuestion What do you do when you re dumped by the Girl Next Door Answer Throw yourself into another madcap adventure and travel from Cape Town to CairoA week after breaking up with the GND his travelling companion through Central America Peter Moore heads off to Africa to lose himself for a while In the grand tradition of 19th century scoundrelas, explorers and romantics, Africa strikes him as the ideal place to find solitude and anonymity in the face of a personal crisis.What follows is Peter s journey from one end of the Dark Continent to the other Travelling the fabled Cape Town to Cairo route by any means of transport he can blag or if he must, pay his way onto, it s an epic trek that sees our intrepid Antipodean experience everything from the southernmost city in Africa to the Pyramids, vast game parks and thundering falls, cosmopolitan cities and tiny villages as he journeys through the very heart of Africa And travelling on his own, it s inevitable that Peter falls in with a motley cast of characters and has a myriad misadventures including coming face to face with a wild Hyena with very bad breath, crossing the treacherous Sani Pass, the highest in Africa, narrowly escaping a riot by hiding in a coffin shop, saving oil covered Penguins in South Africa, acting as an extra in a WW2 epic, not to mention dodging 20,000 single woman trying to catch the eye of the king of Swaziland during the annual Reed Dance And then there was the time when he was kicked out of Robert Mugabe s birthday bash at gunpoint

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      Published :2019-02-04T23:50:47+00:00

    One thought on “Swahili for the Broken-Hearted”

    1. Really, man? An entire book dedicated to your public transport exploits and staying in hostels? "They were tribesmen of the African coffee table book variety" pretty much sums this book up. It was written by a guy who has never lived in Africa, nor taken the time to learn about this continent, much less understand the people. And as far as the pantheon of travel-writing is concerned, this is pretty lame. Sorry. It just sucks.

    2. Although a "sequel" to THE FULL MONTEZUMA, this one can be read before that one; the "broken hearted" aspect doesn't overshadow the story as much as the title would suggest. Solid writing, but not much especially humorous or clever. Moore seemed to lose some momentum by the time he reached Ethiopia, and frankly so did I.

    3. Peter Moore is an Aussie travel blogger turned writer. Years ago I'd read his misadventures online, and when I'd found he was publishing books, really wanted to get my hands on them and have a read, but since they're Aussie publications, it was a royal headache to track them down and have them shipped to the States.Imagine my happiness when I found them in eBook format for 5$ a pop. No shipping! No hassle! The book:First, don't expect prose. He has some nice stuff in there, but nothing that's go [...]

    4. I enjoyed this book, especially because Peter Moore takes you through the roads of Africa, less travelled. However, I was disappointed to read his version of the history of District Six in Cape Town as it was not the people now living in Kayalitsha and other townships who were moved, but the colored people from the Cape Flats. Although he has travelled Africa before writing this book, he made it clear that he will not do so again, as everything seems to have fallen into disrepair. I suppose I ca [...]

    5. A humour-filled account of a backpacker's journey from Cape Town to Cairo, this book gave me an insight into both the backpacker way of travelling as well as the people of the countries Peter Moore visited.His experiences were certainly entertaining, thought-provoking and surprising and I found myself speeding through the book much faster than I had expected.I occasionally felt that the descriptions of the long road journeys overshadowed infrequent insights into the actual places he visited, tho [...]

    6. Nothing in the book to write home about except that it is really good writing. It flows extremely well although I can't shake off the fact that such backpacking adventures can only be undertaken by those who have some amount of privilege. you can't really even call it a travel book because it's just mostly a guy's daily travel log becoming a book. There isn't really much novelty or actual travel advice in the book - just how the author managed to successfully take rickety cars, and buses without [...]

    7. 3.5 starsPeter, a travel book author, took his broken heart and traveled from one end of Africa to the other. He gave himself 6 months to get from Cape Town to Cairo and to "get over" his most recent breakup. As he travels Africa he shares his adventures in each country he visits, makes friends along the way, and demonstrates a flexibility that is a bit hard for this Type A reader to embrace. Moore didn't do Africa in posh and luxurious ways but rather on the cheap, or as cheap as he could. I lo [...]

    8. Eh? Moore's writing is often entertaining, and he certainly has a way with words. But as far as a travel narrative goes, he spends far more time discussing his bus trips between various places and the random people he befriended along the way than he does any of the places he actually visits. At no point during the book did I feel particularly compelled to visit any of the cities or countries he discusses, solely because there was often more about how much his hotel room cost or whether he felt [...]

    9. Swahili for the Broken-Hearted by Peter Moore was born out of his break-up with his girl friend and traveling companion. After spending months with friends in South Africa, basically living on his friends' couch, watching soap operas, he decides it's time to head home. Rather than head home by hopping on a plane bound for Australia, he decides to travel overland along the eastern coast of Africa for Cairo.Although Moore's book is about traveling through Africa, don't confuse it for a travel guid [...]

    10. This book was fantastic. It was perfect for me to read wile traveling in Africa. Admittedly, I didn't go all the way from Capetown to Cairo, but I certainly traveled by a variety of transportation choices (some questionable) in several of the countries he passed through. His descriptions as a Westerner - mostly of his first impressions of Africa - are hilarious, and really appreciated by this first timer to the continent. I think going on an epic journey is one of the best ways to overcome heart [...]

    11. I enjoyed Peter Moore's writing and his mostly phlegmatic attitude towards his fellow travellers. Many hair-raising adventures and endless hot, dusty, exhausting journeys in death-trap vehicles. Fun. I would read something else by Mr Moore and would recommend this to anyone who enjoys travel or is interested in other countries/cultures, and to those who (like me) are just armchair globetrotters! Mr Moore's irreverance and good humour are really refreshing and just the thing if you're in a dark m [...]

    12. Peter Moore might very well be one of the greatest traveling companions in the world. The guy's honest, down to earth and, more importantly a leaf on a rocky river. From being confronted with an unclimbable Kilimanjaro to a life threatening uprising in Ethiopia, he let's the experiences flow underneath and past him, making notes and sharp observations in the process.

    13. Screamingly funny - had me laughing out loud on the train.This is the first of Moore's books I read - I then went on to read some of his others which had the same effect.He has a real way with words, managing to describe the most mundane things in such a way that made me almost wet myself with laughter!

    14. I got this book as a gift. Unfortunately, I read a couple of chapters and hurled it across the room. You have to weep if this the state of travel writing. Someone needs to educate the author, with perhaps a book by Robert Byron. If you are looking kindling -- this book will certainly make the cut.

    15. Really enjoyed this book, reminded me of all the crazy and slightly reckless positions I put myself in similar travels in Latin America.I particularly loved how Moore didn't mince words - if a place was shit, he had no gripes saying so. Makes me want to backpack again!

    16. He spelling of Isiolo was wronglled the book but most interesting while reading this book, a friend called me to ask if I can host his German friend on a border run which in almost felt like Peter Moore's stopped by my house.

    17. Very entertaining read. I was keen to read up on going to Africa before my trip there in a couple of months, particularly Peter's Kilimanjaro trip. Has given me a good feel for where I'm going but has made me even more nervous about climbing Kilimanjaro.

    18. This book is hilarious! One of the first books to make me genuinely laugh out loud! It's also quite inspirational! I have a soft spot for Africa and soon after reading this book did a trip over there staying at, and seeing many of the places Moore went to! Great, easy to read book.

    19. A light hearted travel essay about a guy who hitch-hiked his way from South Africa to Egypt and his various adventures along the way. Not the best written but certainly enjoyable. I read it on the beaches of Zanzibar and thought it was fun.

    20. Heart broken Aussie dude legs it through Africa. Gets pissed, turns down some horny Eurotrash backpacker, escapes a riot in Ethiopia, lives to tell the tale. Africa is not on my list of preferred destinations.

    21. I absolutely loved this book, it had me in stitches at times, I felt like I was on adventure with him. I would read this over and over!

    22. funny, fun, and addictive make me wanna travel across Africa to mend a broken heart too. But my journey will cross the romantic morocco if i could ;p

    23. Meh. The start was enjoyable but then the pace slowed considerably and so did my interest. I made it to the end but only just.

    24. Good follow up to The Full Montezuma. Very easy to read and really makes you feel you are there with him.

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