The Rules of Civility: The 110 Precepts That Guided Our First President in War and Peace

The Rules of Civility The Precepts That Guided Our First President in War and Peace In the early eighteenth century a young George Washington copied out by hand rules for civil behavior in a little notebook These rules borrowed from a text used by generations of Jesuit tutors

  • Title: The Rules of Civility: The 110 Precepts That Guided Our First President in War and Peace
  • Author: Richard Brookhiser
  • ISBN: 9780684837239
  • Page: 270
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In the early eighteenth century, a young George Washington copied out by hand 110 rules for civil behavior in a little notebook These rules, borrowed from a text used by generations of Jesuit tutors, provided a common sense framework for any young gentleman who hoped to rise in society Washington took these rules very much to heart he carried the hand written list throuIn the early eighteenth century, a young George Washington copied out by hand 110 rules for civil behavior in a little notebook These rules, borrowed from a text used by generations of Jesuit tutors, provided a common sense framework for any young gentleman who hoped to rise in society Washington took these rules very much to heart he carried the hand written list throughout his life, from the coldest day at Valley Forge to the triumph at Yorktown, and through all eight years of his distinguished presidency Our first president was in many ways an ordinary man who, through singular self discipline, rose to greatness But his progress was no accident As biographer Richard Brookhiser explains, Washington was fastidious about hewing to a strict code of conduct, courtesy, and honor Clearly, it was this deliberate, disciplined way of approaching life s difficulties that vaulted Washington ahead of his luminous peers intellectual giants like Jefferson, Franklin, and Hamilton and into a position of leadership What can we learn today from Washington s example In his commentary on Washington s Rules of Civility, Brookhiser demonstrates how seemingly simple notions like courtesy, respect, honesty, and humility contribute to worldly success than the Machiavellian traits that modern politicians seem to revere In stark contrast with today s political and business leaders, Washington frowned upon those who relied on cleverness, sensitivity, stubbornness, or impetuousness to get ahead Material success without honor, he believed, was worthless Though at first glance many of Washington s rules may seem quaint or outdated, Brookhiser makes their meaning and relevance clear for modernreaders surfeited with false sophistication, and seriously proposes that we follow the modest example of perhaps the greatest American who ever lived This edition of Rules of Civility, enlivened by Richard Brookhiser s insightful and witty commentary on how these rules could, and

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    • Free Download [Fantasy Book] ☆ The Rules of Civility: The 110 Precepts That Guided Our First President in War and Peace - by Richard Brookhiser ✓
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    • thumbnail Title: Free Download [Fantasy Book] ☆ The Rules of Civility: The 110 Precepts That Guided Our First President in War and Peace - by Richard Brookhiser ✓
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      Published :2019-08-23T05:29:51+00:00

    One thought on “The Rules of Civility: The 110 Precepts That Guided Our First President in War and Peace”

    1. This is an interesting and short little book compiled and annotated by historian Richard Brookhiser. The 110 Rules of Civility (etiquette) was originally compiled by French Jesuits in 1595, translated into English in 1640 and copied in abbreviated form by George Washington in his youth (aged 13-ish give or take a few years in either direction). He carried that list of rules with him for the rest of his life and used them to mold himself into the man he wanted to be.Brookhiser, who wrote a fine b [...]

    2. Fascinating story, great character developmentuld barely put it down. The original premise, however, was hard to swallow. After living in New York City as a single career girl for many years, I spent hundreds of nights out with a girlfriend and (considering myself a fairly attractive woman), never did I sit down next to a single man, whose 'brother' never shows up, and he is rich, handsome, single and takes my friend and myself for a night on the town and many after : ) Just saying' But truly lo [...]

    3. A bit hard to rate. I mostly just disliked the editor's notes; when they strayed from being actually about Washington, they were pretty irrelevant & needless.

    4. In his youth, George Washington copied over 100 popular maxims to help guide his behavior. While not necessarily covering the moral aspect of life, they do provide insight into the traits that Washington, along with other genteel folk of the period, thought were important in an individual.Brookhiser does not an excellent job annotating the original text and occasionally points out areas where Washington's behavior fell short of the standard. This helps the reader have a look at Washington the ma [...]

    5. A slim tome that I read to learn something about G. Washington and manners of the eighteenth century. I did learn a little about each. Mostly I learned that decency hasn't changed much and GW attempted to act as befitted his station in life. That is, a white, male, aristocrat. Some vaguely amusing commentary on the rules themselves. Kinda wish he had modernized the English or had provided the original wording.

    6. Sometimes we forget the importance of good manners and a few rules or constants in our lives. George Washington was successful as our nation's president for a lot of reasons. But this bookgives some solid insights on leadership, courtesy and self-respect. I loved it! This was a quick read with some solid historical connections.

    7. Short book, chock full of pithy admonitions which all boil down to Washington's first rule: "Every action done in company ought to be done with some sign of respect to those that are present." And isn't that the main point of all etiquette? Brookhiser's introduction and commentary add context, dimension, and a bit of humor. Quite a few portraits of Washington throughout the book.

    8. Everyone should read this once in their lifetime. The original rules were written by the Jesuits back in the 1500's and their teachings are still relevant today. I loved it and admire the thoughts it espouses. A little more common courtesy, self-control and humility would be welcome in today's society.

    9. Like Great Gatsby in reverse, it reads like the ubquitous martinis shaken and poured throughout the book. Very aptly describes uptown and downtown New York in the 30's, with a couple of twists I enjoyed it.

    10. Interesting depiction of life in New York City during the 1930's. There are social divisions but the lines do get crossed. Main character, Katey, is strong. At first didn't see the love interest between her and Dickie. The book was only O.K. and at times I wasn't sure where the story was going.

    11. Fascinating, I didn't believe I would like this book but found it fun to read. The 1920's rules of behaviour observed are missed frequentlybut so refreshing when they occur.The punctuation is ancient, I remember being corrected for using it, Ouch.

    12. This book reminds me of some of my favorite books (e.g Wallace Stegner's Crossing to Safety) in that it reminds me to appreciate the moment and the accumulation of all of life's moments, which of course can entail a bit of melancholia. It's a fast and very enjoyable read.

    13. Quick, fascinating read. In his teenage years, George Washington copied 100 rules for good manners. This book list these rules and has updated info about the rules. It was interesting to see how some rules are outdated but more interesting to notice that many of these rules still apply today.

    14. Just couldn't get into it! I didn't care enough about the characters, and the storyline dragged. Maybe I shouldn't have tried to read it while so sleep-deprived (I tried to read it in January), but still. Didn't even finish it.

    15. Found this a fascinating read. The scene, New York City 1938 and the characters and city come alive with each new page. Apparently a debut novel and I have to say a huge BRAVO!

    16. I did not love the book - it was interesting but a little boring and confusing. Washington's 100 rules of civility were interesting and appropriate, even for today.

    17. Loved the format and loved the updated language of George Washington's rules (after Washington's original wording). Also loved the artwork.

    18. Quick and inspiring look at what greatness acts like. Some adult humor by the editor. Required reading for my boys' HS study on G. Washington.

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